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Posts Tagged ‘influence’

EPExecutive Presence by Sylvia Ann Hewlett is a guide for leaders seeking to achieve the top level of success in their respective fields. While actual talent, training, and proven abilities are important factors in whether someone is successful or not, there are also some intangible qualities that all people who have achieved success have managed to perfect. These qualities are just as essential to master, yet many people are oblivious to their importance. Executive presence (EP) is the unknown quality that some people appear to have and others do not. Luckily, most of the elements of EP can be learned.

The three main pillars of executive presence are:

  1. Gravitas: All aspects of a person’s behavior. Leaders with strong gravitas exude confidence, decisiveness, integrity, emotional intelligence, reputation, and vision.
  2. Communication: How a person talks, including formal presentation skills. Top communication traits include superior speaking skills, the ability to command a room, forcefulness, the ability to read people, a sense of humor, and body language.
  3. Appearance: How a person looks. It is important for leaders to be well groomed, be physically fit, and wear simple, stylish clothing.

To learn more, please visit http://www.bizsum.com

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The Like SwitchIn The Like Switch, former FBI Special Agent Jack Schafer and author Marvin Karlins offer proven techniques for reading people, developing mutually beneficial friendships, and influencing how people are perceived by others. Spanning both verbal and nonverbal communication cues, the authors educate readers on how to improve their likeability through body language and word choice.

 

Schafer and Karlins assert that:

  • There are four main building blocks of friendship that form the basis of the Friendship Formula. This formula states that Friendship = Proximity + Frequency + Duration + Intensity.
  • Friendly people are like fireflies: They capture people’s attention, even from far away. People see others before they hear them speak, so nonverbal signals are crucial in getting others’ attention and forming first impressions.
  • First meetings should adhere to the Golden Rule of Friendship in order to set the right tone for future encounters. This rule states, “If you want people to like you, make them feel good about themselves.”
  • The Laws of Attraction govern the likelihood that two people will be drawn together. Using these laws can help enhance relationships, but some of the laws are not designed to work with certain personality types.
  • Speaking the language of friendship can ensure that friendships are stronger and last longer. The key to speaking this language is encouraging others to speak, listening carefully to what they say, displaying empathy, and responding positively to their comments.
  • Relationships face many kinds of peril in the digital world; however, digital relationships also have some distinct advantages, including ease of finding common ground and the ability to research others to learn about their interests.

To learn more, please visit http://www.bizsum.com

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FascinateIn Fascinate, world-renowned brand consultant Sally Hogshead introduces readers to the seven universal fascination triggers: lust, mystique, alarm, prestige, power, vice, and trust. Exploring research from behavioral and social studies, historical precedents, neurobiology, evolutionary anthropology, and feedback from thousands of consumers, Hogshead explains what fascinates people and why and shows marketers how to apply this valuable knowledge to their own brand campaigns. By knowing how to use the right fascination triggers in the right ways, companies can more effectively achieve their desired results.

Marketing professionals can use the seven universal fascination triggers to more effectively influence consumer decision making. As they put the triggers to use, however, they must consider several concepts:

  • There are several factors to consider when determining how fascinating a message already is. Marketers must think about how much consumers gravitate toward their messages, how much interest they generate, what kind of response they elicit, and how they prompt people to think.
  • The lust trigger uses the anticipation of pleasure to seduce a consumer. Marketers can use lust to create an experiential attachment by getting consumers to stop thinking and start feeling, making the ordinary more emotional, using all five senses, and teasing and flirting.
  • The mystique trigger intrigues consumers with unanswered questions. Marketers can use mystique by sparking curiosity, withholding information, building mythology, and limiting access.
  • The alarm trigger causes consumers to take action under the threat of negative consequences. Marketers can trigger alarm by defining consequences, creating deadlines, increasing perceived danger, focusing on the most feared crises, and using distress to steer positive action.
  • The prestige trigger causes consumers to focus on symbols of rank and respect. Marketers can enhance prestige by developing emblems, setting new standards, limiting availability, and making consumers earn it.
  • The power trigger forces consumers to focus on the people and things that control them. Marketers can use the power trigger to dominate, control the environment, and reward and punish.

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Invisible Influence

There’s a lot more to selling — whether it’s oneself, a product, or a service — than most people would imagine, according to Kevin Hogan. Of course, there’s the message, but that is secondary to other factors, including the where, when, and who in any given situation. Each of these elements carries subtle, subliminal clues that can mean the difference between getting a “yes” or a “no.” In Invisible Influence, Hogan uses scientific studies to reveal unique approaches to influence, beginning with overcoming “reactance,” which he defines as “resistance to influence.” From that starting point, Hogan presents 52 techniques for influencing people to sell, market, and communicate more effectively and profitably.

To download three free summaries, please visit our site.

Related book summaries in the BBS library: The Business of Influence, The Influence Game, 10 Steps to Successful Sales

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87820689When individuals think or do something they would not ordinarily think or do, they have been influenced. Although, the heart of any traditional Marketing and Public Relations (PR) effort is to influence an intended stakeholder, it has always been an imprecise method with nonlinear results. Now, with the advent of innovative and evolving technologies, organizations can center influence at the core of their corporate strategies using an elegant Six Influence Flows framework. As Philip Sheldrake explains in his book The Business of Influence, this framework involves identifying an organization’s stakeholders’ influence with each other with respect to both the organization and its competitors. Applying the Six Influence Flows via the Influence Scorecard, an extension of Kaplan Norton’s business performance management system’s Balanced Scorecard, maps influence objectives throughout an organization’s corporate strategy.

To download three free summaries, please visit our site.

Related book summaries in the BBS library: Elements of Influence, Increase Your Influence at Work, The Secret Language of Influence

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As we move deeper and deeper into the political season, it has becomes even more apparent that personal image is of utmost importance to candidates. While this is true for politics, it is also something that we should all be aware of as we seek advancement in our own careers, approach job interviews, and present ourselves online.

Alan Barnard and Chris Parker recognize the correlation between political campaigns and success in their book Campaign It!. In their book, they explain that a campaign is a process-driven way of thinking and behaving that can produce success in any area of life. They claim that:

  • Campaigns must have a cause, principle, or aim that will improve some aspect of a current situation. The cause provides the motivation—and sometimes, the courage—to campaign.
  • The audience is the person or group that needs to approve or endorse the communication campaign. Campaigners must take the time to discover their values, beliefs, behaviors, and agendas, and then identify potential communication channels to reach each segment.
  • The campaign is brought to life and the narrative is shared through the integration of activities, which must be properly sequenced and fully integrated so that each one lays the foundation for the succeeding one.
  • As the campaign narrative is told through integrated activities, it should change audience question marks of doubt into exclamation marks of commitment.

To read more, visit http://www.bizsum.com/summaries/campaign-it.

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Kurt Mortensen defines charisma as the ability to easily build rapport, effectively influence others, inspire them to achieve more, and in the process make allies for life. It is a vital motivational life skill that can and must be mastered if one is going to succeed in influencing others. Charisma is the ability to empower and persuade others to believe and trust in a leader and want to be influenced by that leader. Charisma permeates every aspect of life; Career, relationships, ability to influence, and income are all related to one’s ability to radiate charisma. In The Laws of Charisma, Mortensen outlines 30 skills, traits, and attributes that generate charisma. These can be learned, developed, and mastered.

For a free trial of EBSCO Business Book Summaries click here.

Related book summaries in the BBS library: Increase Your Influence at WorkInfluencerThe 360-Degree Leader

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