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Archive for the ‘Personal Development’ Category

the-oz-principle

In The Oz Principle, Roger Connors, Tom Smith, and Craig Hickman use Dorothy’s empowering journey from L. Frank Baum’s The Wizard of Oz as a metaphor to illustrate the transforming effects of personal accountability and ownership on organizational results. The authors demonstrate how accountability can be achieved through a four-step approach based on practical and proven results: Muster the courage to see it, find the heart to own it, obtain the wisdom to solve it, and exercise the means to do it. When properly applied, these steps enable leaders, managers, and frontline workers in any organization to overcome obstacles and deliver improved bottom-line results.

Whether a company is languishing or thriving, performance invariably improves when employees take on greater levels of personal accountability and ownership. Accountability is an empowering force that produces proven results and provides a solid foundation for long-lasting solutions. Following Dorothy’s journey in The Wizard of Oz, The Oz Principle provides four steps for avoiding victimization and achieving organizational accountability:

  1. See It. A negative situation must be carefully assessed through self-appraisal. There must be a realization that more can be done to achieve the desired outcome.
  2.  Own It. Finger-pointing and blame must be set aside. Ownership and responsibility for a situation and one’s role in it must be shouldered in order to move the organization forward.
  3. Solve It. It is important to find and apply new ideas that may help the organization overcome obstacles and anticipate what is ahead.
  4. Do It. Employees must bravely commit to following through with solutions to achieve the target outcomes.

To learn more, please visit www.bizsum.com

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The Power of 50 BitsPeople’s natural inclinations when making decisions tend to default to patterns that do not help them in the long run. While there is broad agreement among researchers about the science underpinning these tendencies, people need more solutions to help overcome the gap between what they really want to do and what they actually do. In The Power of Fifty Bits, Bob Nease offers a seven-pronged strategy to deal with common decision-making failures. He explains why people struggle with inattention and inertia and demonstrates how simple changes in environment can nudge people toward better overall outcomes.

People typically have good intentions, but they often struggle to act on them. This is because people’s brains have evolved in a way that makes inattention and inertia the two primary obstacles to action. Fifty bits design acknowledges the brain’s natural limitations and addresses them with the following seven strategies:

  1. Require choice: Interrupting a process, usually an existing one, and forcing a person to make a decision before he or she can continue the process.
  2. Lock in good intentions: Making some type of statement–a pledge, a signed document, or automatic reaction–in the present, which increases the chances that people will follow through on good behavior in the future.
  3. Let it ride: Making the desired behavior the default and asking people to opt out of a behavior rather than opt in, thereby using inattention and inertia for good.
  4. Get in the flow: Placing a cue or call to action in a location where people have already devoted their attention.
  5. Reframe the choices: Altering what a cue triggers in people, which directs people’s attention toward some aspects of an issue and away from others.
  6. Piggyback it: Making a behavior typically subject to inertia and/or inattention the side effect of something that people seek out or find pleasurable.
  7. Simplify…wisely: Removing barriers to change or improving fluency (the relative ease with which the brain processes information). Simplification of either type is usually, though not always, a smart design choice.

To learn more, please visit http://www.bizsum.com

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The Power of Being Yourself.jpg

In The Power of Being Yourself, Joe Plumeri challenges people to be truly authentic in both their professional and personal lives and not shy away from emotion and passion. He gives readers eight universal principles to live by to achieve lasting success, fulfillment, and self-actualization.

Plumeri challenges people to be themselves in their professional and personal lives by using eight principles:

  1. Everyone has the same plumbing.When business is conducted across nations and cultures, it can be easy to overemphasize the differences between people. Differences are just distractions from aspects of humanity that unite people.
  2. Show the way to grandma’s house. Realizing visions requires bringing them to life by associating them with smells, sounds, and all the senses.
  3. Cut your own path. Respect and destiny are attained by courageously following a passion and working hard to be the best and most capable within that passion.
  4. Let sadness teach you. Loss can be a difficult but effective teacher. When people care for their employees, coworkers, family, and friends, they learn what is truly valuable in life.
  5. Look up, not down. Difficult times are a true test of people’s ability to rise above circumstances and stay positive. The willingness to look up and believe that anything is possible brings transformation.
  6. Play in traffic. Getting excited about the other principles will not matter much if people do not then go out and apply them and take action. “Play in traffic” means exposing oneself to opportunities for serendipity.
  7. Make your heart your teleprompter. The heart should be the primary compass in decision making. Tools like data, technology, market research, and consultants should remain tools; they should never be substitutes for what people’s hearts are saying.
  8. You gotta have a purpose!People need a reason to begin each day and to do their work beyond making money.

To learn more, please visit http://www.bizsum.com

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QuittingIn Quitting, bestselling author Peg Streep and social worker Alan Bernstein expose the defects in the culture of persistence, and explore the science of healthy quitting in life situations, from relationships to work choices to recreation. They reveal that truly successful people are masters of both persistence and quitting, which includes the understanding of when to continue a course of action and when to disengage from it.

According to the authors:

  • Common wisdom holds that winners never quit, and quitters never win. This myth of the power of persistence has a deep hold in American culture, and leads people to remain in relationships, jobs, and situations when the healthier choice would be to leave.
  • Healthy quitting–stopping a course of action in a thoughtful, deliberate manner in order to pursue a new, more fitting goal–is a life skill that everyone needs to learn.
  • Truly successful people are masters of both persisting and quitting. When they quit, they completely detach from their previous goals and devote themselves to pursuing new ones.
  • Emotional intelligence is a person’s ability to understand and work with their emotions. Emotionally intelligent people can deal with the feelings caused by quitting. They also understand what makes them happy, which is essential to establishing attainable goals.
  • People need to understand themselves, and their approaches to challenges, in order to set attainable goals. Mapping, or writing down goals, helps people keep track of their progress and determine whether a goal is worth pursuing or whether it is time to disengage from it.
  • True goal disengagement is complete only when a person re-engages with a new, attainable, suitable goal that furthers his or her personal development and happiness.

To learn more, please visit http://www.bizsum.com

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13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t DoIn 13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do, author and therapist Amy Morin presents the 13 most important things that people who are emotionally on top of their games do not do. No one does everything right all the time, but by acknowledging all 13 of these behaviors, actions, and feelings, people can make significant progress in their lives. Mentally strong people have better chances of success, develop better relationships, and are generally happier and healthier.

Mentally strong people do not:

  1. Waste time feeling sorry for themselves. This is a self-destructive behavior that leads to more negative emotions.
  2. Give away their power. People can still be kind while demanding that others respect them.
  3. Shy away from change. Change can be scary and uncomfortable, but it is necessary for growth.
  4. Focus on things they cannot control. Trying to manage what is out of one’s control just leads to increased anxiety and stress.
  5. Worry about pleasing everyone. Conflict and confrontation are often uncomfortable, but constantly avoiding it makes it impossible for people to reach their goals.
  6. Fear taking calculated risks. Sometimes people’s fears and anxieties do not actually match the risks they are taking.
  7. Dwell on the past. Self-reflection can be healthy, but dwelling can be self-destructive.
  8. Make the same mistakes over and over. Repeating the same mistakes does not change anything.
  9. Resent other people’s success. Resenting someone else’s success can cause a person to behave illogically.
  10. Give up after one failure. Some of the most accomplished people in the world failed dozens of times before achieving success.
  11. Fear alone time. Creating time to be alone with one’s thoughts is a powerful experience.
  12. Feel the world owes them anything. A sense of entitlement does nothing but anger others.
  13. Expect immediate results. Change takes time.

To learn more, please visit http://www.bizsum.com

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Mind GymSometimes life’s circumstances are out of people’s control. However, how individuals think, feel, and behave as a result of those circumstances is very much within their control. It is simply a matter of learning to think, react, and respond in positive and productive ways. In Mind Gym, authors Sebastian Bailey and Octavius Black share scientifically based exercises and techniques anyone can use to train the mind to think positively and productively, including resetting thoughts, taking control, deepening connections, persuading others, resolving conflict, letting creative juices flow, and minimizing stress. The result is a more successful, fulfilling life.

Mind Gym provides techniques individuals can use to control and change their thoughts and actions in order to have more successful lives:

  • Resetting the mind from automatic thinking to conscious, attentive, optimistic thinking.
  • Taking control of actions and overcoming procrastination.
  • Deepening connections with others and adopting an “I’m Okay/You’re Okay” mind-set.
  • Persuading others in order to enhance personal relationships and achieve objectives.
  • Resolving conflict by breaking destructive communication patterns, engaging in authentic dialog, and removing drama from relationships.
  • Letting creative juices flow to accentuate inspiration and innovation.
  • Minimizing stress in order to maximize bliss.

To learn more, please visit http://www.bizsum.com

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Mindfulness at WorkThe professional world is characterized by high levels of stress, discontentment, and burnout. Individuals spend their entire lives laboring in their chosen professions, and the joyless attitudes that define much of the modern approach to work produces palpably unpleasant results. Spurred by the prevalence of mindless misery in the workplace, Dr. Stephen McKenzie pennedMindfulness at Work in an attempt to introduce the meditative discipline of mindfulness to today’s modern professionals. By offering helpful tips on integrating mindfulness practices into people’s everyday jobs, Dr. McKenzie explores how forging meaningful connections results in positive health benefits, increased job satisfaction, and improved performance.

According to the authors:

  • Leadership is highly valued in the workplace, but a precise definition can be difficult to identify. Mindful leadership is characterized by true engagement with others and the realization of collective goals rather than self-interest and power-centric objectives.
  • Individuals generally pick professions and stick to them for their entire working lives. This can often seem like a prison sentence, but by incorporating mindfulness principles into their professional activities, individuals can transform their outlooks and increase their personal satisfaction.
  • Professional relationships can be hard to manage; therefore, leaders must place relational perspectives around mindful principles to find common ground and work for a common good.
  • Creativity is a frequently used buzzword in the workplace, but it is often seen as elusive and difficult to capture within the parameters of a job description. Mindful professionals can heighten their creative output by simply letting go of whatever is stopping them.
  • Many job-related tasks can seem monotonous and frustrating, but by engaging with the tasks at hand and shedding previous notions of their characteristics, mindful professionals can find deep enjoyment in even the most mundane chores.
  • All industries can benefit from a healthy dose of mindfulness, but some professions in particular can see very specific results, including those in healthcare, law, education, sales, and the arts.

To learn more, please visit http://www.bizsum.com

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