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Archive for the ‘Employee Development’ Category

In The Mobile Learning Edge, author Gary Woodill defines mobile learning as a personalized form of learning that takes place on a mobile electronic device. It allows for speedy communication, it is portable and convenient, it creates active learning experiences, and it allows for learning connectivity at any time and in any location. The content taught in mobile learning is also more likely to be retained because it is learned when the student wants to learn; because the student is actively seeking to learn, the information taught is more likely to be relevant and useful to the learner.

For a free trial of EBSCO Business Book Summaries click here.

Related book summaries in the BBS library: Tailored Learning, Managing the Mobile Workforce, The Six Disciplines of Breakthrough Learning

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5 Steps to Expert

5 Steps to Expert

What does it take to become an elite performer? How can anyone become more expert in their field? Author Paul Schempp has spent his career as a professional speaker, coach, and consultant examining these questions. In his book Five Steps to Expert, Schempp discusses five specific, consistent steps through which all people progress to become experts, as well as three ways that experts attain their level of proficiency.

Expertise is not innate, but developed through hard work. Although experts represent a small percentage in any field, Schempp believes that anyone can become more expert at what they do by studying these principles, internalizing his advice, and practicing it in the workplace.

For a free trial of EBSCO Business Book Summaries click here.

Related book summaries in the BBS library: Go Put Your Strengths to Work, The Personal Efficiency Program, Ordinary Greatness

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This month’s issue of Chief Learning Officer has an interesting article concerning learning management systems and the emerging  practice of integrated Web 2.0 functionality within these systems to increase collaboration and participation. I believe this is a great move in the corporate learning space. Many companies have sophisticated ways of tracking  formal learning and an individual’s progression towards a certain task, but informal learning is much harder to quantify and record. As a result, many companies have ignored the impact of informal learning on an individual’s learning process.

As Ed Cohen writes in the article:

With the introduction of each new technology and methodology, our industry is trying to make things more efficient and more effective. However, we can’t increase the rate at which a learner consumes information, so now the object is to make it more available.

Informal learning helps fill in the holes that formal learning leaves open. Related readings, videos, social networking, and discussion forums are all forms of informal learning that people participate in on a daily basis, yet many aren’t even aware that this constitutes learning.

Much of informal learning falls into the category of “just-in-time learning.” Employees today, especially younger employees, are accustomed to having information available to them 24/7. They learn what they want to learn when they want to learn it. While an LMS is great for providing structured learning that is job-specific and will help employees excel in a given position, it does not always provide the answer to a particular task or question, which is where informal learning comes into play.

By implementing Web 2.0 tools within an LMS, companies can give their employees access to on-demand learning materials and facilitate a space for collaboration with colleagues. While this type of learning may be harder to measure and track, that shouldn’t prevent companies from implementing informal learning in addition to their formal learning activities.

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In the education community, a useful body of research evidence related to training development and delivery has emerged only in the last 20 years. With that evidence, training practitioners now have a better idea of how learning occurs in the brain. In Evidence-Based Training Methods, Ruth Colvin Clark summarizes the most current research that relates to the decisions training professionals face on a daily basis. She explains techniques that maximize learning, provides evidence about the best ways to use examples and practice, and discusses how to organize content.

For a free trial of EBSCO Business Book Summaries click here.

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In 2000, Becton, Dickinson and Company (BD) was competing in a medical technology market that was much different from the one it had grown up in. The current market was fully globalized, and regulations were changing significantly, along with customer buying patterns. Company executives realized that many people in the company were unsure of BD’s direction. In response, BD revamped its learning and development infrastructure. In Leaders as Teachers, Edward Betof examines the leaders-as-teachers program and the benefits it can bring to a company, such as aligning the learning function with the organization’s goals, serving as a catalyst for leadership development, strengthening the organization’s culture, and promoting change.

For a free trial of EBSCO Business Book Summaries click here.

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One of the biggest challenges facing business today is finding, grooming, and retaining the best and the brightest hires. Many organizations choose to assign this responsibility to the human resources department, but according to Alan Weiss and Nancy MacKay, this can be a fatal error.

The best organizations out there know that the war for talent must start at the top, where great leaders can assert control over the hiring process and foster top talent. In The Talent Advantage, Weiss and MacKay draw on their years of expertise in the recruitment and retainment field to provide successful strategies, techniques, and tips that will give any company a competitive advantage in the talent wars.

For a free trial of EBSCO Business Book Summaries click here.

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For the first time in history, corporate managers face the challenge of managing four generations at once: the Matures, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y (the Millennials). As Boomers get ready to retire en masse, their children offer a unique challenge to corporations, which need to change their workplace cultures, recruiting methods, and retention strategies or face a loss of billions in turnover. Managers need to help their organizations and employees adapt to the highly educated, technologically savvy, confident, and demanding Millennials. The Millennials, born between 1980 and 1999, do things differently than their Boomer parents and bring a fresh new perspective to the workplace. If corporations make the changes necessary to keep their Millennial hires, all generations will ultimately benefit. In Keeping the Millennials by Dr. Joanne G. Sujansky and Dr. Jan Ferri-Reed, corporate managers learn strategies to create a multi-generational workplace.

For a free trial of EBSCO Business Book Summaries click here.

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